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America’s Original Source For Home Goods Bringing Our Best To You Since 1842!

Established in 1842 Hildreth’s is America’s first and the Hamptons largest in interior and exterior home furnishings and accessories.
Including the largest selection of indoor furniture Hildreth’s carries luxurious bedding, top of the line bath towels, spa essentials, housewares, candles and hostess gifts, table linens, baby cribs, children’s clothing, gifts and toys, area rugs, lamps & lamp shades and even sewing supplies.
With over 80,000 square feet in 3 convenient locations including East Hampton and Southampton Hildreth’s celebrates its 13th generation on the East End of Long Island and being in business since 1842.
Hildreth’s experienced sales staff, designers and decorators offer the best in customer service, the finest in quality products, all for an outstanding value…

Hildreth’s bringing our best to you since 1842.

Our Blog

Established in 1842 Hildreth's Home Goods is America's oldest and the Hampton's Largest in interior and exterior home furnishings and accessories. You will find everything for any room in and around your house. In our Blog you can read about Home Decor & Design tips, and so much more. add your comments we would love to hear from you!

Filtering by Tag: area rug

How to Place a Rug in a Room

Hildreth's

Before you start looking at new area rugs (or reimagining the placement of old ones) take the full length and width measurements of the entire room, then the length and width of measurements of the area you’re trying to define—for instance, a seating area with a coffee table and chairs, or a bed with a pair of nightstands.  This will help you determine the size of rug you’ll need to pull together different spaces within the room. Then follow these tried-and-true decorating recommendations:

Living Room

1. Choose an area rug that’s big enough to fit underneath all furniture. This is especially helpful (and impressive) in large living rooms, to keep the proportions similar and avoid the look of “floating” furniture. Some designers go by the 18-inch rule, leaving approximately this much bare floor between the edges of the rug and the walls, but we think you can go even smaller, particularly in smaller rooms.

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2. Go for a rug that’s large enough to rest under the front legs of all major furniture—sofa, love seat, armchairs. We love this look, which instantly unifies seating areas, in most living rooms. If the room is divided into two seating area, you can get even more creative. Just use the same under-the-front legs arrangement, but pick two different rugs in the same color palette.

3. Avoid the “postage stamp.” These area rugs—typically 3’ x 5’ and smaller—can accommodate a coffee table and maybe the legs of an armchair, but nothing else, and wind up looking wildly out of proportion. That said, if you have a small rug—say, a vintage flea-market find—that you’d like to show off as an accent, try layering it on top of a larger one that follows either of the two rules above, and offset the small rug at an angle so it stands out.

Dining Room

We adhere to a single rule in the dining room: the area rug should be centered under the dining table, and should be wide enough and long enough that the chairs stay on the rug even when pushed back.

Kitchen

Many people prefer a 2’ x 3’ area rug in front of the sink or island (or both), and we like this arrangement just fine. But if we have our druthers, we’ll always go for a longer runner between the island and sink, or in front of any long expanses of cabinets.

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Bedroom

1. Find an area rug that can fit comfortably underneath the bed and extend at least a foot from either side; any less will cause the rug to look dwarfed by the furniture. Basically, you want your feet to hit the rug when you slide out of bed in the morning, and ideally your nightstand will fit on top, as well.

2. Measure the width of the bed, and place a smaller rug at the foot. We prefer a rug that extends several inches past the edges of the bed, as seen here, but you can also get one that fits the dimension more closely. Just don’t go smaller than the bed’s width, or the rug will look like a doormat.

Bathroom

In most baths, you have two options: either place the area rug in front of the vanity/sink, or in front of the tub. That’s exactly what you see here, with the added visual flourish of layering two indoor/outdoor rugs of different sizes on top of each other. How fun is that?

How to Choose a Stair Runner Rug

Hildreth's

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“How do I choose a rug for said stair installation?”

The way we see it, any discussion of choosing a rug to install on the stairs should start with which types of runners are not appropriate for the stairs. Because the stairs are one of the highest-traffic spots in the house, and because they take more of a pounding from pinpointed body weight in the same spots, over and over, some area rug weaves just aren’t up to the challenge. These include hand-knotted wool and cotton chenille rugs, which feel soft and cozy underfoot, but can be too delicate under constant traffic. And while tufted wool also feels plush and luxurious, its density and higher profile makes it extremely difficult to staple through, and thus accurately (and safely) install on the stairs. Indoor/outdoor rope weaves are likewise too thick for stapling—though there are plenty of other options in this category; we’ll get to those in a moment. You’ll also want to avoid jute, which can be harder to clean, and paper rugs, which are strictly for low-traffic areas, on the stairs.

Fortunately, there are plenty of other rug weaves that work beautifully in stair installations, and we’ve got a rundown on our favorites. Don’t forget to use a rug pad for your stair installation; it will help give the rug extra grip against slippery stairs, and will also offer a little more cushion under foot.

Woven Wool

Tightly woven and extremely durable and long-lasting, woven wool area rugs are a terrific option for the stairs. They can take a beating for years with little sign of wear, are easy to vacuum and spot clean, and look as good as new with regular maintenance. The low profile and lighter weight of woven wool rugs makes them easy to position around stair risers and landings, and simple to staple in place.

Micro Hooked Wool

All the durability of woven wool in a plusher, bouncier weave. Micro-hooked wool runner rugs can stand up to repeat foot traffic and vacuuming. While professional cleaning is required for heavier stains, lighter or fresh stains can be blotted up and spot cleaned with your favorite enzymatic cleaner or a bit of white vinegar (always test an inconspicuous area first for color-fastness!)

Woven Cotton

Lightweight, easy to clean, and available in a huge range of patterns and colors, woven cotton rugs are ideal for stairs installations. They’re featherweight, slender in profile, and have a flexible weave, which makes them a cinch to wrap tightly around bullnoses and risers. Woven cotton rugs are also the most affordable option for a stair installation, which often requires two to three runners to complete from landing to landing. Stains should be treated promptly, so they don’t have a chance of setting in. Because steady foot traffic can make lighter-colored cotton rugs appear dingy over time, we always opt for patterns with great camouflage factor, like saturated or multicolor stripes, plaids, or geometric patterns.

Indoor/Outdoor Rug

Similarly lightweight and flexible, for ease of installation, indoor/outdoor rugs come in a wide array of fun patterns that create killer stair installations. Because they’re so affordable and easy to clean—vacuum regularly, and spot clean stains with a bit of water, detergent, and a soft-bristle brush—indoor/outdoor runner rugs are perfect for the stairs in homes with kids or pets. It’s essential to tightly wrap indoor/outdoor rugs around risers and staple them securely to prevent movement and possible slips of the foot.

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